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A Common Family Factor Underlying Language Difficulties and Internalizing Problems: Findings From a Population-Based Sibling Study

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The Common Family Factor:

  • Co-occurrence Unexplained by Family Factor: 31%
  • Co-occurrence Explained by Family Factor: 69%

Language difficulties and internalizing problems, such as anxiety and depression, often co-occur in children, but it is not known why.

This Norwegian Mother, Father and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) followed Norwegian siblings from age 5 to 8.

The co-occurrence of language difficulties and internalizing problems is mainly due to family factors (e.g., genetics, shared environment) as opposed to non-familial factors.

The degree to which family factors contributed to language difficulties and internalizing problems did not change from age 5 to age 8.

Suggested Citation

National Center on Improving Literacy (2023). A Common Family Factor Underlying Language Difficulties and Internalizing Problems: Findings From a Population-Based Sibling Study. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Office of Special Education Programs, National Center on Improving Literacy. Retrieved from http://improvingliteracy.org.

References

Helland, S.S., Roysamb, E., Brandlistuen, R.E., Melby-Lervag, M., & Gustavson, K. (2020).
A common family factor underlying language difficulties and internalizing problems: Findings from a population-based sibling study. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 53(5), 399-409. DOI: 10.1177/0022219420911634